CSILC dans les médias

Entrevues radio sur C-22 à travers le Canada

o-ICI-RADIOCANADA-facebookRadio-Canada 05/04/2017 – Notre coordonnateur national, Tim McSorley, a commenté le passage en troisième lecture de C-22, un projet de loi visant la création d’un Comité de parlementaires pour surveiller la sécurité nationale et le renseignement, malgré ses nombreux défauts et lacunes. M. McSorley a été interviewé à la première chaîne de Radio-Canada pour les émissions du retour à la maison de Rimouski, Matane (16h50), Regina (17h24), Edmonton (16h22), Moncton (17h37) et Vancouver (16h25).


Entrevues radio sur les mémos de la torture à travers le Canada

o-ICI-RADIOCANADA-facebookRadio-Canada 31/01/2017 – Notre coordonnateur national, Tim McSorley, a parlé des directives ministérielles sur la torture permettant aux agences de sécurité d’utiliser des renseignements qui ont été obtenu sous la torture, et du fait que le ministre de la sécurité publique n’a toujours pas bougé sur ce dossier malgré que cela fait bientôt un an qu’il dit qu’il révise les directives. M. McSorley a été interviewé à la première chaîne de Radio-Canada aux émissions suivantes : TorontoWinnipegOttawaSudbury et Vancouver.


C-22 – The Intelligence Agency Oversight Bill That Has No Real Oversight (podcast)

Screen Shot 2017-04-10 at 12.58.09 PMThe View From Up Here 04/04/2017 – Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) and Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC, now CSE) remain the envy of agencies in other countries. The powers granted to these agencies in Canada have increased by a magnitude as in other nations. But those other nations have effective oversight of their activities, via committee or public boards that review and release their findings on a regular schedule. Not so in Canada. While on the campaign trail, Justin Trudeau talked about changing that, like he talked about changing a lot of things. For the vast majority of those promises, Canada is still waiting. Now, C-22, An Act to establish the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, has passed second reading and ignored all evidence, testimony and past transgressions in favor of a Harperesque misnomer that makes oversight worse, not better. Sunny ways, suckers. Tim McSorley, National Coordinator for the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group (ICLMG) joins us to discuss the deficiencies and risks to Canadians of C-22. Écoutez la discussion


CSIS’s alternative facts universe

Par Matthew Behrens, Now Toronto 15/03/2017 – The lack of accountability structures for such misbehaviour enables and emboldens CSIS to continue operating with impunity. But those looking to rein in Canada’s spies are not hopeful. The Liberals’ Bill C-22, to create a Parliamentary committee to oversee national security, has been criticized by the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group (ICLMG), which last week raised concerns about the “broad powers granted to ministers to block investigations, limitations on committee members’ access to information, and the committee being responsible solely to the Prime Minister [leading the committee to become] a figurehead, unable to adequately carry out the oversight it is mandated to do.” While the ICLMG adds that any such committee “must be complemented by an independent, expert review body [that] would encompass all of Canada’s national security activities,” CSIS head Coulombe is sanguine about maintaining the status quo, ending his report by stating: “Canadians can rest assured that we undertake this work with the utmost respect for the fundamental rights and freedoms that we seek to protect.” Lire plus


Gerald Caplan: How can Canada condone torture?

caplan-headshotThe Globe and Mail 24/11/2016 – In Canada, the previous government had told CSIS that it could use information derived through torture. The Liberal opposition was outraged. As well, the Conservative government’s anti-terrorist Bill C-51 was interpreted as opening the door to CSIS to use torture in its work, even though information thus acquired is notoriously unreliable. The Liberals were outraged. Yet the new, Liberal government is still “assessing” the issue, even though Canada has agreed to sign the UN’s optional protocol to the Convention against Torture allowing for the inspection of detention centres, where torture often takes place in secrecy. A number of heroic Canadians have dedicated themselves to ending the use of torture by Canada. They include, among others, Matthew Behrens, Monia Mazigh, Amar Wala, Barbara Jackman, Roch Tassé and his International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group. Why should their efforts be needed at all? Torture is both immoral and useless as a tool to fight terrorism. It outrages Canadians. How can our governments condone it for even one more day? Lire plus


Tim McSorley parle du projet de loi C-22 à Revue Politique

CPAC 23/11/2016 – L’entrevue commence à 21:53.

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When CSIS Comes Knocking

Screenshot-at-Jul-01-11-59-13Canadaland 12/07/2016 – A number of Muslim men have reached out to Monia Mazigh after having CSIS show up unannounced at their homes or workplaces. The intelligence agency has been doing this for years and says the discussions are voluntary, but some people see them as intimidation techniques. Monia is the national coordinator for the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group. She joins Supriya and Vicky to talk about these CSIS visits, as well as the government’s tabled legislation–Bill C-22–that would create parliamentary oversight of national security agencies. Read Monia’s Huffington Post article hereÉcouter l’entrevue


No-fly lists remain point of contention among civil liberties advocates

MoniaMazighThe Hill Times 04/04/2016 – “Initially, it was an immediate threat to aviation security. So that was the legislative basis for getting on the list. And then they added to that the whole range of terrorist offences that are now in the Criminal Code. So as a result of that alone, it seems to me that the number of people on that list was going to increase. The other thing that happened was that they lowered the standard. So it’s not an immediate threat, but a reasonable grounds to suspect,” said Prof. Bennett. He said that the Secure Air Travel Act, which allows for the no-fly list, should not have been included as part of Bill C-51 and should have been separated, and proper study and debate should have taken place around the act. Monia Mazigh, a Canadian representative with International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group, agreed with Prof. Bennett. “We want the government to be more transparent,” said Ms. Mazigh, who is married to Maher Arar and made headlines advocating on his behalf in 2002 when he was deported to Syria and tortured there for more than a year. She said she is concerned about false-positives, when a name may match a name on the list, but the person being stopped is not the person under suspicion. “This is an intrusion into peoples’ privacy and life, because they are going to put names on this list, but they do not know why they are on this list. They cannot even know they are on this list until the day where they try to board the plane,” she said. “Even if we don’t agree with this list, but why don’t you try to inform people. But still the government does not answer our demands,” she said. Lire plus


Refugee advocates call for oversight of CBSA

iPolitics 31/03/2016 – While the government has committed to creating a parliamentary committee to monitor Canada’s spy agencies, even if the committee reviews oversight mechanisms for CBSA, advocates say it won’t be enough. “It’s a good step,” said Mazigh, but her organization, the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group is asking for a process that’s more comprehensive, which means an independent agency that’s able to communicate with all of the other review agencies so they can investigate complaints together. “I don’t think parliamentary oversight can do that, so this is our position and we hope the minister or the government will consider this criteria when they are going to suggest any new oversight and review mechanism…if any,” said Mazigh. Lire plus + The Canadian Press + CBC News


Liberals looking for ways to improve review of federal border agency

The Canadian Press 15/03/2016 – The Ottawa-based International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group wants an independent probe of in-custody deaths at the border agency. “How many more deaths do we need before something is done to stop this tragedy?” said Monia Mazigh, the organization’s national co-ordinator. “The detention of migrants shouldn’t be systematic unless there are criminal activities involved.” Lire plus


Liste d’interdiction de vol  :  le manque de procédure claire préoccupe

160103_jl6yi_syed_ahmed_terrorisme_sn635Radio-Canada 07/03/2016 – La liste d’interdiction de vol du Canada suscite de vives réactions auprès de l’auteure et coordonnatrice nationale de la Coalition pour la surveillance internationale des libertés civiles, Monia Mazigh. Elle déplore le manque de procédure claire et transparente afin de permettre les personnes dans ce cas de retirer de la liste. Le dossier a refait surface le 3 mars dernier quand le jeune Syed Adam Ahmed, un enfant de six ans de Markham était à l’aéroport. Il s’est trouvé sur la liste de voyageurs à haut risque de plusieurs compagnie aériennes. Le problème: c’est que son nom est semblable à celui d’un homme reconnu coupable d’actes terroristes. La famille s’était fait promettre que ce serait corrigé. Mme Mazigh est familière avec la situation. Son mari, le Canadien d’origine syrienne Maher Arar, a été torturé en Syrie après avoir été expulsé des États-Unis sur la base d’informations erronées fournies par la GRC. Selon Mme Mazigh, le gouvernement n’agit pas rapidement pour résoudre de tels dossiers. Elle rappelle que le rapport O’Connor sur la situation de son mari a été publié en 2007. Or, aucune recommandation n’a été mise en place. Écoutez l’entrevue radio


Le procès de Salim Alaradi aux Émirats arabes unis ajourné au 29 février

Radio-Canada 14/02/2016 –  Monia Mazigh au téléjournal de Radio-Canada. Visionnez


Monia Mazigh parle du cas de Salim Alaradi

Radio-Canada 08/02/2016 – Notre coordonnatrice nationale, Monia Mazigh, en entrevue à Radio-Canada Windsor sur le cas de Salim Alaradi – un citoyen canadien détenu aux Émirats arabes unis pendant un an et demi sans accusation et ayant subi de la torture. Il est tout à coup accusé de terrorisme par les EAU et le CSILC et Amnesty International Canada craignont que son procès ne soit pas équitable. Écoutez


We need oversight AND review of national security activities in Canada

1310 News 27/01/2016 – Interview by ICLMG’s National Coordinator
Monia Mazigh on why we need oversight AND review of national security activities in Canada. Écoutez


Canada to review ‘troubling’ torture policy

CANADA-VOTE-TRUDEAUMiddle East Eye 22/01/2016 – Monia Mazigh is the national coordinator of the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group, which brings together dozens of civil society organisations working on human rights issues in the context of the “war on terror” across Canada. She told Middle East Eye that the minister’s statement was “a first step” towards opening up a public dialogue into information sharing and its impact on Canadians. “We are very much looking forward to see more of what they are going to propose,” Mazigh said. Mazigh’s husband, Syrian-Canadian national Maher Arar, was detained in the US in 2002 and secretly transferred to Syria, where he was tortured in prison for a year before being able to return to Canada. A commission of inquiry examined Canada’s role in his extradition and found that Canadian RCMP officers provided the US with “inaccurate” information about Arar that “portrayed him in an unfairly negative fashion”. “It is very likely that, in making the decisions to detain and remove Mr Arar, American authorities relied on information about Mr. Arar provided by the RCMP,” the commission’s report stated. The Canadian government later apologised to Arar and gave him $10mn in compensation. Lire plus


Thousands flagged for scrutiny by new air passenger screening system

La Presse canadienne 14/01/2016 – Canadians don’t know enough about the criteria being used, said Monia Mazigh, national co-ordinator of the Ottawa-based International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group. “Why do we need to do it?” Mazigh wonders whether the border agency has scientific studies to show the new techniques will make Canada safer, or if it is simply following in American footsteps. “It’s very important for Canadians to know that.” Lire plus


Red-flagging Canada’s children on no-fly lists

f880d48da34b4832a1d90ad1f60f9f91_18Al Jazeera 13/01/2016 – « The security value that is generated through this list can be reduced considerably in the absence of adequate controls and oversight to measure and demonstrate the level of compliance and performance for those tasked with the application, » he said in an email. Monia Mazigh is the national coordinator of the Ottawa-based International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group. She said it is impossible to know the effectiveness of no-fly lists since the government has failed to disclose any facts, and has so far refused public consultation. Mazigh knows all too well the dangers of such lists. Her husband, Maher Arar, was mistakenly placed on a threat list and arrested in New York after the September 11 attacks. Arar was one of the first victims of the CIA’s extraordinary rendition programme as he was suspected of being an al-Qaeda member and deported to Syria – where he was imprisoned and tortured for nearly a year before being returned to Canada. A Canadian inquiry later found Arar had been a victim of « false and inflammatory information » given by the RCMP to the CIA. Thirteen years later, it remains unclear if anything has changed. « We suspect that he’s still on this US list even today, » said Mazigh. Lire plus


Liberals’ C-51 Changes Open To Consultations, Public Safety Minister Says

Ralph GoodaleLa Presse canadienne 09/01/2016 – The government has pledged to ensure all Canadian Security Intelligence Service warrants respect the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. That would roll back new provisions allowing CSIS to disrupt terror plots through tactics that breach the charter as long as a judge approves. It has also committed to creating a special committee of parliamentarians to keep an eye on national security operations. Organizations including Amnesty International Canada and the Ottawa-based International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group have urged the Liberals to go further by implementing neglected 2006 recommendations on comprehensive security review from the inquiry into the overseas torture of Maher Arar. Lire plus


Canada’s no-fly list is ‘very mysterious’ and leaves targets little recourse, say critics

syed-adam-ahmedCBC news 06/01/2016 – The ICLMG, which considers the no-fly list « an unconstitutional program, » started tracking how many people felt they were mistakenly or unfairly targeted by a watch list in 2008. It published a report of its findings in February 2010, but the organization still receives stories of airport and border-crossing troubles, said national co-ordinator Monia Mazigh. « It seems like in the past months we are receiving more stories like that of people who think that they are on a no-fly list, or have been prevented to enter the United States, or who have been harassed at the border, » she said. […]  Mazigh said it’s « very unlikely » the government would remove a name from the list. « There is nothing really that people can do, » she said. Which is why it’s all the more important for the government to be more transparent about the process of how people’s names end up on the list, she said, so that they can better challenge that decision. Lire plus


Vie privée 20.15 – Entrevue

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Vie privée 15/11/2015 – Écoutez l’enregistrement de l’entrevue de notre coordonnatrice nationale, Monia Mazigh, à l’émission de radio Vie privée 20.15, diffusée le 15 novembre, sur la liste d’interdiction de vol et autres violations des droits et libertés civiles dans le contexte de la soi-disant guerre au terrorisme. Écouter


Canadian Mining Puts Lives and Democracy at Risk in the Americas – Report

1920525_10151864289041594_912041408_nUpside Down World 24/09/2015 – MiningWatch Canada and the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group released a report today that squarely links Canadian mining interests throughout the Americas with intensifying repression and violence against mining-affected communities. ‘In the National Interest? Criminalization of Land and Environment Defenders in the Americas’ provides evidence from five countries that illustrates how the Canadian government and Canadian mining companies have helped turn the law against individuals and groups fighting for their water, lands, livelihoods and ways of life. The report argues that the model of industrial mineral extraction that Canada promotes abroad is informed by deregulation of the extractive sector at home and a colonialist past and present that — with renewed fervour in recent years — views those who speak out as a threat to the national interest and hence a target for spy agencies, tax audits, funding cuts, and gratuitous policing. “This is nowhere more explicit than with the adoption of the Anti-Terrorism Act 2015, which gives enhanced powers to Canadian intelligence agencies and redefines security to include preventing interference with anything designated as part of the economic or financial stability of Canada, sending a clear signal to Indigenous peoples and environmental groups defending land and the environment,” says Roch Tassé, former National Coordinator of the ICLMG. Lire plus


Government launches deportation proceedings against Harkat

mohamed-harkat-arrives-at-the-supreme-court-to-hear-that-theOttawa Citizen 18/09/2015 – Late last month, almost four weeks into the federal election campaign, Harkat received an official letter from the CBSA informing him that the first step in his deportation process had begun. “He was totally devastated,” Harkat’s wife, Sophie, said in an interview. “That big grey cloud he’s had over his head for 13 years, it just got a lot darker.” Harkat said her husband had hoped the government wouldn’t pursue his deportation. “How big a threat can he be if they wait 15 months to issue this letter?” Two years ago, an electronic tracking bracelet was removed from Harkat’s leg and his release conditions relaxed to allow him to travel outside of Ottawa, use a mobile phone and an Internet-connected computer. Monia Mazigh, national co-ordinator of the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group, said the move to deport Harkat comes at an odd time: with an election in full swing and with no certainty about what party will form the next government. “We see this as a very, very dangerous move,” said Mazigh, who argued that Canada should not deport someone if there is even the slightest possibility that they will be mistreated or tortured. Lire plus


Group wants Harper to help Salim Alaradi, man held in U.A.E.

The Canadian Press 07/08/2015 – The case caught the attention of several organizations, including Amnesty International Canada, the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group and the Libyan Canadian Community Organization, who are among those who’ve salim-alaradi-family-stop-using-this-photoasked Harper to act for Alaradi. “Your intervention is critical in ensuring that Mr. Alaradi’s human rights will be respected and upheld,” their letter said. “It is vital that Canada demand that he be released unless he is charged immediately with a recognizable criminal offence and brought promptly to trial in fair proceedings.” When asked about Alaradi’s case, the Department of Foreign Affairs only said that consular services were being provided to a Canadian detained in the U.A.E. and that “senior Canadian officials” were in contact with the “appropriate authorities” in that country. The reason the groups addressed their letter to Harper, and not the foreign affairs minister or others in government, was because they believe a top-level intervention is needed in the case, said Monia Mazigh, national co-ordinator of the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group. “I think Canada does not really want to rock the boat and that’s been a kind of a pattern in many cases of Canadians detained abroad,” she said. “We’re asking the prime minister to take this case and to do something concrete.” Lire plus


Opponents position Bill C-51 as election issue

cmc-ci-billc51-protest180730731jpg.jpg.size.xxlarge.letterboxThe Toronto Star 18/04/2015 – Opponents of Bill C-51 are playing the long game. Armed with signs and flyers, about 50 demonstrators gathered outside the downtown Toronto offices of Liberal MP Adam Vaughan on Saturday to protest the Conservatives’ far-reaching anti-terrorism bill, which would expand police powers and give more muscle to Canada’s spy agency. They are urging Vaughan and other Liberals to abandon their stated support of the bill and “reject fear,” as one sign read, by voting against C-51, which they believe infringes on the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. But with the odds stacked against them, they say they are looking beyond the outcome of the vote next week, when the bill is due to return to the floor of the House of Commons, to the upcoming federal election. […] There were representatives from the Law Union of Ontario, the Idle No More movement, the Ottawa-based International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group and CUPE 3902, the union representing academic workers at the University of Toronto. Lire plus


Au pays de la terreur, l’État est roi

3302_tn~v~au-pays-de-la-terreur-l-etat-est-roiL’itinéraire 01/04/2015 – « C-51, c’est juste du théâtre politique ! », s’insurge Roch Tassé, le coordonnateur de la Coalition pour la surveillance des libertés civiles. Sur papier, la loi prévoit d’alourdir les peines, de généraliser les moyens de contrôle et de faciliter les arrestations préventives en même temps que les détentions passeront de 72 h à 7 jours. « Comme le gouvernement l’a martelé, les États-Unis et la France vont plus loin en matière de contrôle et surveillance des populations. Mais ce qui nous a été présenté comme un retard est plutôt un progrès du point de vue des libertés », défend Pierre-Alain Clément, chercheur à la chaire Raoul-Dandurand de l’UQÀM. Dans les faits, avec C-51, un ensemble d’infractions seront désormais traitées comme des activités reliées au terrorisme. Un concept pour le moins large et ambigu qui ouvrirait la porte à la loi de l’arbitraire. « La nouvelle loi permettrait de faire des arrestations préventives sur la simple base qu’un policier pourrait soupçonner que vous pourriez commettre un crime », déplore M. Tassé en insistant sur le i du conditionnel. Lire plus


Three hearings on C-51 would have done the trick

Behind the Numbers 01/04/2015 – Opposition efforts to remove or amend this and surrounding sections on CSIS’s new powers to disrupt, to take out the ability to request permission from a judge to breach someone’s Charter rights and to specifically prohibit CSIS from detaining people in their duties, were shot down one by one last night. The Department of Justice lawyer suggested any change in this language would undermine the purpose of the Act.

“Existing measures have already led to serious violations of the rights of innocent people and the government now wants to introduce new measures notwithstanding the fact that it has not yet implemented the necessary oversight and review mechanisms to protect Canadians,” says Roch Tassé, national co-ordinator of the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group, one of several human rights and civil liberties advocates to endorse a statement demanding the government repeal C-51.

“The measures introduced in Bill C-51 greatly increase the potential for further national security abuses,” he adds. “Before introducing such drastic new measures, the government needs to demonstrate that existing legislation is insufficient and must implement the type of robust and comprehensive oversight and review mechanisms proposed by Justice O’Connor who presided over the Arar Inquiry, as well as create opportunities for greater parliamentary oversight.” Lire plus


Government plans four amendments to soften anti-terror Bill C-51

blaney.jpg.size.xxlarge.letterboxThe Toronto Star 30/03/2015 – As the Conservative government gets set to unveil a handful of amendments to its sweeping proposed anti-terrorism legislation, it slammed critics including the Canadian Bar Association as lacking credibility. […] The B.C. group joined Amnesty International Canada, the Canadian Civil Liberties Association, the Canadian Muslim Lawyers Association, the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group, La Ligue des Droits et Libertés, and the National Council of Canadian Muslims in a joint statement Monday that called for the anti-terror bill to be withdrawn. Amnesty’s Canadian head, Alex Neve, said the bill should not give “legislated power to CSIS to violate the Charter of Rights” and requiring prior judicial authorization for such breaches is merely an attempt to offer “a sheen of legitimacy” to a bad bill. Lire plus


C-51 aurait plombé le mouvement étudiant, selon Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois

984522-pour-gabriel-nadeau-dubois-yLa Presse 17/03/2015 – Si le projet de loi antiterroriste avait été en vigueur pendant le printemps étudiant, les opposants à la hausse des frais de scolarité auraient-ils défié en si grand nombre le règlement municipal P-6, qui force les organisations voulant prendre la rue à fournir leur itinéraire aux autorités? Le coordonnateur national de la Coalition pour la surveillance internationale des libertés civiles, Roch Tassé, en doute. La crainte de se voir accoler une étiquette de terroriste aurait probablement refroidi les ardeurs de nombre d’entre eux, croit-il. Et c’est sans compter que les protestataires ayant pris part à des actions plus vigoureuses comme le blocage de l’accès au port de Montréal ou au pont Jacques-Cartier auraient pu se retrouver avec de sérieuses accusations criminelles sur les bras, avance M. Tassé. «Ce sont deux infrastructures fédérales qui sont importantes pour l’économie du pays. Dans ces deux cas, on pourrait oser croire que le texte de loi actuel pourrait s’appliquer», a-t-il souligné en entrevue téléphonique. Les définitions contenues dans C-51 stipulent que le fait d’entraver la capacité du gouvernement à assurer et la «stabilité économique du Canada», et «le fonctionnement d’infrastructures essentielles», figurent parmi les activités portant atteinte à la sécurité du pays.

L’une de ses principales dispositions prévoit par ailleurs que plusieurs ministères fédéraux pourront partager avec les agences comme le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité (SCRS) les informations qu’ils détiennent sur les citoyens canadiens. Selon une source au sein du mouvement étudiant, l’agence d’espionnage canadienne suivait de très près les opposants à la hausse des frais de scolarité. «Avant, pendant et après» le conflit, «au moins 20» étudiants ont été rencontrés par des agents du SCRS, a confié cette source. Si la loi antiterroriste que caresse le gouvernement conservateur avait alors été en place, l’agence aurait pu puiser dans une mine d’informations personnelles actuellement confinées dans les dossiers de différents ministères fédéraux. «On aurait pu demander l’historique de voyage d’un individu, son rapport d’impôt, ses dossiers médicaux si possible», a expliqué M. Tassé. «Il n’y aurait pas de limites, il y a 17 ministères qui peuvent partager l’information», a-t-il poursuivi. Le ministre Blaney a soutenu la semaine passée que les agences sécuritaires ne feraient pas grand cas de manifestations déclarées illégales par les autorités municipales comme P-6 et qu’elles ne partageraient «pas nécessairement» les informations recueillies à l’occasion de ces événements. Invité à commenter les exemples spécifiques du blocage d’un port ou d’un pont, son bureau s’est contenté de réitérer par courriel, lundi soir, que «C-51 vise les terroristes, pas des manifestants». Aux yeux de Roch Tassé, la parole de l’élu conservateur ne suffit pas, même en présumant de la «bonne foi» du gouvernement en place: il faut que les balises soient clairement établies dans le texte de loi, qui lui seul garantit le respect des protections constitutionnelles, insiste-t-il. Lire plus


First Nations vow legal challenge of anti-terror bill

Perry BellegardeOttawa Citizen 12/03/2015 – Paul Champ, of the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group and a former Crown prosecutor: The bill “confers extraordinary powers on security agency to violate the human rights of Canadians and ‘disrupt’ their lives, all in secret,” he said. “The (1977-81) McDonald Commission (into RCMP wrongdoing) called these sorts of measures ‘dirty tricks,’ but this bill goes much farther.”

“Strict controls on the activities of security intelligence agents is essential in a democracy for two critical reasons: their activities routinely intrude upon or impinge on the private lives and civil liberties of Canadians – it’s inherent to the work; and they carry out this sensitive work in almost complete secrecy.” Lire plus


Roch Tassé and Nicole Fillion: Defending the right to defend rights

NicoleEtRochInter Pares 11/03/2015 – Interview with Roch Tassé of the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group (ICLMG) and Nicole Filion of the Ligue des droits et libertés (LDL)

Inter Pares: Roch, could you share your concerns about the current context?

Roch Tassé: As we see it, this is the culmination of a process in Canada. Over the last ten years, but especially over the last two or three years, political discourse in the government here has changed. It is beginning to sound very much like what we have heard in Latin America over the last decade – an attempt to delegitimize all dissent towards the state. We have seen this in the natural resource sector in Latin America, where Canadian companies are operating projects.  Laws are criminalizing legitimate opposition to these projects. Latin American governments have characterized dissidents as extremists. In some cases, they have even labeled them terrorists and used old anti-terrorist laws, as in Chile, to criminalize individuals.

Over the last two or three years in Canada, we have heard the same argument used in RCMP reports, in annual reports from the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), and in the policy statement from Public Safety Canada released three years ago under Vic Toews, all using the same type of language found in Latin America. That is to say, dissenters are referred to as extremists. In the environmental movement, for example, extremists could potentially resort to civil disobedience strategies, or even terrorism. So the discourse in government documents tries to associate dissent with terrorism in a fairly categorical manner. After two years of this shift in discourse, we are now facing legislation that enshrines it in law. The process is nearly complete. Lire plus


Le CSTC, la surveillance globale et le projet de loi C-51: Une entrevue avec notre Coordonnatrice aux communications et à la recherche, Anne Dagenais Guertin
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CIBL reçoit 04/03/2015 – CIBL 101,5 La radio citoyenne de Montréal, en collaboration avec des organismes du milieu, présente une émission différente chaque semaine avec une même priorité: mieux informer le citoyen montréalais. Le premier mercredi du mois, CIBL reçoit La solidarité en action en collaboration avec Alternatives. Des membres d’Alternatives se joignent à l’équipe de CIBL pour faire la lumière sur des dossiers chauds qui mobilisent les communautés d’ici et d’ailleurs, comme l’exploitation des ressources naturelles, le réchauffement climatique, etc.

Le 4 mars 2015, La solidarité en action a reçu la Coordonnatrice aux communications et à la recherche de la CSILC, Anne Dagenais Guertin, pour un échange sur les activités du Centre de sécurité des télécommunications Canada (CSTC), la surveillance globale et les possibles impacts dangereux du nouveau projet de loi C-51.

Écoutez en baladodiffusion de 21:00 à 35:00:

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Bill C-51 Showdown – Radio interview with our National Coordinator Roch TasséOttawa 2

From The Margins 02/03/2015 – Canada’s proposed new Anti-Terrorism Act, 2015, introduced as the now infamous Bill C-51, may be a game changer in curtailing civil liberties of those who dissent too strongly against whatever the government may deem as key to their economic strategy; in other words, it looks to target not just what most people may think of as terrorism, but move the targets beyond that range. This is the fear of indigenous communities, opponents of the fossil fuel economy, the labour movement, and many other activists, all who may be targeted by the Bill’s machinations. Concerns abound, from the proposed new powers of the Canadian Security and Intelligence Service (Canada’s spy agency) to violate Charter rights based on suspicions of what they deem to be terrorism / perceived activities that undermine the security of Canada … to concerns over increased powers of preemptive detention (based on suspicions of future crimes) … and on the list goes.

On this show, these are the issues that will be dissected. I have a conversation with Roch Tasse, National Coordinator of the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group, who will elaborate on and explain major concerns with this Bill. Following that, you’ll hear from Jim Emberger, Spokesperson for the NB Anti Shale Gas Alliance, who see themselves, other environmentalists and many dissenters in general as being targeted on account of Bill C-51 and ominous reports from the RCMP. Écoutez en baladodiffusion


The misuses of national security: An interview with human rights defender Roch Tassé

RocheTasseThe Monitor 01/03/2015 – In July, after nearly a half-century of defending human rights and civil liberties in Canada and abroad, Roch Tassé will retire, leaving his current post as co-ordinator of the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group (ICLMG), which he has held since its creation in 2001.

The Franco-Ontarian began his life in activism as a social worker and community organizer in Ottawa’s eastern townships, spending four years in the 1970s with the federally sponsored Company of Young Canadians, a creation of the Trudeau government “to co-opt the activism of the radicals in the late 1960s,” he jokes over a coffee in early February. After the project was disbanded, Roch became the editor of a newspaper serving the francophone community outside of Quebec, where he worked until 1985. That was the year he took responsibility for Inter Pares’s Central America program, which brought him to Nicaragua, El Salvador, Guatemala and eventually Chiapas, Mexico where civil wars had displaced entire communities and state repression was the norm. With a network of NGOs, Roch took part in UN-brokered peace negotiations in the late-1980s that saw the return of refugees, and the reconciliation of warring factions, among them the Contras and Sandinistas in Nicaragua. Lire plus


Troubled times ahead with new anti-terror legislation

print_2Par Matthew Behrens, rabble.ca 16/02/2015 – Even though the government must know that sections of its legislation may eventually fall victim to a Charter of Rights and Freedoms court challenge, Bill C-51 will nonetheless be a hugely effective tool of repression and control. The mere possibility of charges being laid will have a major chilling effect on whole communities and, especially, community media outlets that might report on home country conflicts in a manner that might conflict with Canada’s foreign policy objectives. There is certainly precedent for this concern. As the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group reported in a 2003 report, In the Shadow of the Law, there had been « hundreds » of instances where people in Canada « are being visited for interviews by security forces without warrants, and taken away for interrogation. Although the full extent of Bill C-36 [so-called ‘anti-terror’ legislation hurriedly passed by Parliament in 2001] was not implemented in these cases, it has been used as a threat to ‘encourage’ voluntary interviews by citing the risk of preventative detention allowed under the Act. Victims of such police conduct have been afraid to come forward publicly for fear of further retaliation. » Lire plus


Lutte antiterroriste: deux juges mettent Ottawa en garde

925679-agents-grc-lors-attentat-parlementPar Laura-Julie Perreault, La Presse 31/10/2014 – Le coordonnateur national de la Coalition pour la surveillance internationale des libertés civiles, Roch Tassé, croit que l’inaction du gouvernement canadien après la commission Arar est une insulte aux citoyens.

«Il y a eu deux commissions [sur les droits de la personne et la sécurité nationale], on a dépensé des millions, mais rien n’a changé. La principale recommandation de la commission Arar était de mettre en place un organisme qui serait le chien de garde de la GRC et des services canadiens de renseignement. Non seulement ça n’a pas été fait, mais il y a aujourd’hui moins de surveillance de leur travail qu’avant», a dit M. Tassé en marge de la conférence. Lire plus


Khadr: Misguided security laws take a human toll

195Par Omar Khadr, Ottawa Citizen 28/10/2014 – “Ten years ago the Canadian government established a judicial inquiry into the case of Maher Arar. That inquiry, over the course of more than two years of ground-breaking work, examined how Canada’s post-Sept. 11 security practices led to serious human rights violations, including torture. At that same time, 10 years ago and far away from a Canadian hearing room, I was mired in a nightmare of injustice, insidiously linked to national security. I have not yet escaped from that nightmare. As Canada once again grapples with concerns about terrorism, my experience stands as a cautionary reminder. Security laws and practices that are excessive, misguided or tainted by prejudice can have a devastating human toll. A conference Wednesday in Ottawa, convened by Amnesty International, the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group and the University of Ottawa, will reflect on these past 10 years of national security and human rights. I will be watching, hoping that an avenue opens to leave my decade of injustice behind.” Lire plus


Ottawa ne devrait pas criminaliser l’apologie du terrorisme

195-2Par Hélène Buzetti, Le Devoir 25/10/2014 – “Mme Zwibel fait valoir qu’il serait en outre très difficile de tracer les pourtours du type de discours jugé inacceptable. C’est aussi l’avis de Rock Tassé, le coordonnateur national de la Coalition pour la surveillance internationale des libertés civiles. « Quand le journaliste Glenn Greenwald, celui qui a travaillé avec Edward Snowden, écrit que le Canada doit s’attendre à être une cible puisqu’il est en guerre au Moyen-Orient depuis 13 ans, est-ce que ce serait considéré comme l’apologie du terrorisme ?, demande M. Tassé. Quand quelqu’un tenterait d’expliquer pourquoi des Palestiniens posent des actes terroristes en Israël, est ce que ce serait considéré comme une apologie ? Quand on essayerait de comprendre les causes profondes, les root cause, du terrorisme, est-ce que ce serait de l’apologie ? Et qu’en est-il de la liberté de la presse ? Un article qui tenterait d’expliquer le terrorisme serait-il perçu comme une apologie ? Sans compter que cela pose la question de la définition même de ce qu’est le terrorisme…»” L’article est seulement accessible aux membres


Stephen Harper, Khaled Al-Qazzaz needs your help

alqazzaz_protest.jpg.size.xxlarge.letterbox-2The Toronto Star 15/07/2014 –  To The Right Honourable Stephen Harper, Prime Minister of Canada: We, the undersigned, are calling upon you as concerned Canadian citizens and organizations to use the full power of your office to demand the immediate release of Canadian permanent resident Khaled Al-Qazzaz who has been illegally detained in Egypt for over 365 days without charge and is in present danger of suffering a heart attack. He should have been promptly charged with a recognizable criminal offence or released. One year is most certainly not prompt. His illegal detention was, in fact, recently extended by an Egyptian court. Your intervention is critical in securing his immediate release and safe return home to Canada. Lire plus

Signataires:
Warren Allmand, International Human Rights Consultant
Maher Arar, Canadian Activist
Margaret Atwood, Author
Gerald Caplan, Public Affairs Commentator
Paul Copeland, C.M., Lawyer, Life Bencher of the Law Society of Upper Canada
Yves Engler, Author and Activist
John Greyson, Associate Professor, York University; Video artist, Writer and Activist
Karen Hamilton, Reverend; General Secretary, The Canadian Council of Churches
Barbara Jackman, Partner, Jackman Nazami & Associates
Abdul-Basit Khan, Partner, WeirFoulds LLP
Raja Khouri, Commissioner, Ontario Human Rights Commission
Kathleen Mahoney, QC, Fellow, Royal Society of Canada
Obiora Okafor, Professor, Osgoode Hall Law School
Alex Neve, Secretary General, Amnesty International Canada (English Branch)
Clayton Ruby C.M., Partner, Ruby Shiller Chan Hasan Barristers; Member of the Order of Canada
Canadian Friends Service Committee (Quakers)
Canadian Muslim Civil Liberties Association
Canadian Muslim Lawyers Association
Downtown Muslim Professional Network
International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group (ICLMG)
Ligue des droits et libertés

Al-Qazzaz jailed in Egypt: Prominent Canadians urge PM to intervene

Khaled-588x330IQRA.ca 15/07/2014 – Today, prominent Canadians stood alongside Canadian Sarah Attia in a press conference at Parliament Hill  and presented an open letter to Prime Minister Stephen Harper about the situation of Khaled Al-Qazzaz.

RochTasse, Alex Neve, and Monia Mazigh, signatories of the letter, each shared aspects of the letter and all urged Prime Minister Harper to intervene and end the ordeal that Khaled, Sarah and their four children have lived through for the last 11 months.

“Thank you to the many Canadian lawyers, academics, authors, and activist [signatories] for your support and for standing alongside my family to call for an end to this injustice” said Sarah Attia. The names of the 129 leading Canadians and 6 organizations who signed the letter can be found on the campaign web pageLire plus


Mobilisation massive contre la surveillance

imageLe Devoir 15/05/2014 – À problème sournois, réponse massive. Un vaste groupe de scientifiques, universitaires et défenseurs des libertés civiles au pays se prépare à dévoiler dans les prochains jours une déclaration commune appelant le gouvernement fédéral à une plus grande retenue en matière de surveillance numérique des citoyens, mais aussi à la mise en place de balises plus claires et transparentes en la matière. Baptisé « Déclaration d’Ottawa sur la surveillance de masse au Canada », le document, dont Le Devoir a pris connaissance, réclame également une mise à jour des lois protégeant la vie privée, lois que les vies numériques sont en train d’éroder.

Alors que le gouvernement fait face à de nouvelles critiques après l’introduction dans un projet de loi omnibus sur le budget — le C-31 — une disposition facilitant le transfert de données personnelles, sans mandat d’un tribunal, entre l’Agence de revenu et les forces policières, les signataires de cette déclaration n’appellent à rien de moins qu’à la fin immédiate de cette pratique décriée depuis plusieurs années. « Tous les changements législatifs susceptibles de toucher l’information, le droit à la vie privée et à la liberté doivent être présentés, justifiés et débattus dans la transparence, écrivent-ils en substance. Aucun de ces changements, affectant l’encadrement de la vie privée, ne doit être enchâssé dans des projets de loi omnibus ou des règlements liés à d’autres sujets. »

Le sociologue David Lyon, titulaire de la Chaire de recherche et d’études sur la surveillance de l’Université Queen’s, est l’un des signataires de cette déclaration, aux côtés d’Open Media, de l’International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group et de l’Association canadienne des libertés civiles — entre autres. Il estime qu’un tel virage est nécessaire, pas seulement pour redonner confiance aux citoyens dans les institutions publiques, mais également pour s’assurer de ne pas bâtir aujourd’hui une société dans laquelle nous n’allons pas vouloir vivre demain. Lire plus


Mohamed Harkat could remain in ‘immigration limbo’ for years

scoc-terror-harkat-20140514CBC News 15/05/2014 – If Harkat’s application to stay is rejected, he could challenge the decision by way of judicial review in Federal Court. But he would have to allege there was some kind of procedural irregularity in the decision.

“It’s very hard to actually challenge the merits,” Aiken said.

If the judge believed a procedural error had occurred, the case could be bounced back and forth between the Federal Court and the Immigration Department for an extended period of time, Aiken said. From there, it’s possible the case could make its way to the Federal Court of Appeal and finally the Supreme Court of Canada. But Aiken, who was counsel for the Canadian Council for Refugees and International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group, which intervened in the Harkat case, said Harkat will not have endless routes of redress. Lire plus


Column: Don’t care about surveillance? You’re probably white and middle class

Glenn Greenwald Discusses His New Book On Edward Snowden And The NSAOttawa Citizen 15/05/2014 – It’s no surprise that minorities are fearful of authority when they are the most targeted and least able to protect themselves. A study from The Pew Internet and American Life Project found that African-Americans and Hispanics with Internet access were more concerned about online privacy than white people.

While privileged populations often laud surveillance measures as a way to fight terrorism, minorities are burdened by the results. Ask the Middle Eastern man with a beard who gets treated like Maher Arar at the border about his thoughts on privacy. And government infringement is only getting worse. The International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group (ICLMG) issued a report that describes how the more than 17 border control programs now in place are disproportionately aimed at certain ethnic groups.

From a social justice perspective, we should care that fellow Canadians are being targeted. But there’s also a more selfish reason. As government spying becomes more sinister, privilege is not a get-out-of-surveillance-free card. The “I-have-nothing-to-fear” defence should be qualified with “until I don’t.” Government has a nasty habit of extending its reach over time. That’s a reality none of us should hide from. Lire plus


Mohamed Harkat “dévasté”

222682-mohamed-harkat-pleurs-lors-pointLe Journal de Montréal 14/05/2014 – Le Conseil canadien pour les réfugiés (CCR) et la Coalition pour la surveillance internationale des libertés civiles (CSILC) se sont dits déçus du jugement de la Cour suprême dans l’affaire Harkat.

Selon ces deux organisations, le jugement maintient «un processus fondamentalement injuste s’appuyant sur des preuves secrètes pour décider d’expulser un non-citoyen, potentiellement vers un risque de torture.»

«Le CCR et la CSILC regrettent que cette décision affirme l’inégalité de la protection des droits fondamentaux offerte aux non-citoyens. Lorsque ces droits sont en jeu pour les citoyens, comme dans les procédures pénales, nous ne tolérons pas l’utilisation de preuves secrètes. Les non-citoyens méritent une chance égale de connaître les preuves utilisées contre eux, et d’y répondre», précisent le CCR et la CSILC dans un communiqué, tout en relevant que la Cour «ne s’est pas prononcée sur les aspects discriminatoires de ces dispositions». Lire plus


La Cour suprême maintient le certificat de sécurité contre Harkat

Mohamed HarkatLa Presse 14/05/2014 – Le Conseil canadien pour les réfugiés (CCR) et la Coalition pour la surveillance internationale des libertés civiles (CSILC) se sont dits conjointement déçus, mercredi, de la décision de la Cour suprême, «qui maintient un processus fondamentalement injuste s’appuyant sur des preuves secrètes pour décider d’expulser un non-citoyen, potentiellement vers un risque de torture». Les organismes considèrent que cela démontre l’inégalité de la protection des droits fondamentaux offerte aux non-citoyens du Canada.

«Lorsque ces droits sont en jeu pour les citoyens, comme dans les procédures pénales, nous ne tolérons pas l’utilisation de preuves secrètes. Les non-citoyens méritent une chance égale de connaître les preuves utilisées contre eux, et d’y répondre», ont-ils indiqué dans un communiqué commun. Lire plus


Supreme Court upholds security certificates

854560-mohammed-harkat-epouse-reagi-avecGlobe and Mail 14/05/2014 – Canada’s top court has upheld a tough anti-terrorism law aimed at deporting foreign suspects, ruling that its saving grace is the ability of judges to keep an eye out for unfairness.

“The discretion granted to designated judges is the crucial ingredient that allows the proceedings to remain fair from beginning to end,” Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin wrote for a unanimous court decision about the federal security certificate system.

Public Safety Minister Steven Blaney expressed satisfaction with the overall ruling, but the Canadian Council for Refugees and the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group said it leaves in place a fundamentally unfair process that relies on secret evidence. Lire plus


Une bourse pour un étudiant engagé

Sameer_ZuberiDroit-Inc 17/04/2014 – Le Département des sciences juridiques de l’université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) a décerné, le 14 avril dernier, la bourse Juanita Westmoreland-Traoré à Sameer Zuberi, étudiant au baccalauréat en droit à l’UQAM. Cette bourse, d’un montant de 3000$, devra lui servir à utiliser sa formation comme un outil de changement au service de la communauté. Elle est décernée en l’honneur de Juanita Westmoreland-Traoré, juge retraitée de la Cour du Québec, qui a joué un rôle important dans la promotion des droits de la personne, de la justice sociale et du droit à l’égalité. Elle est la première femme noire à avoir accédé à la magistrature au Québec et à avoir été doyenne d’une faculté de droit au Canada, celle de l’Université de Windsor. Sameer Zuberi, a obtenu en 2004 un baccalauréat en mathématiques de l’Université Concordia. Il est membre actif du Forum musulman canadien et de la Coalition pour la surveillance internationale des libertés civiles. Lire plus


Êtes-vous préoccupés par les atteintes aux libertés civiles?

iclmg-header--e1396297691525L’Express de Toronto 21/01/2014 – Créée à la suite des attentats terroristes de septembre 2001 aux États-Unis, cette Coalition pour la surveillance internationale des libertés civiles regroupe une quarantaine d’organismes non gouvernementaux, syndicats, associations professionnelles, groupes confessionnels, organisations environnementales, de protection des droits humains et des libertés civiles, ainsi que des groupes représentant des communautés immigrantes et réfugiées au Canada. Chaque semaine, la Coalition diffuse gratuitement, par Internet, sa Revue de l’actualité, une rétrospective des nouvelles importantes concernant la sécurité nationale, la lutte contre le terrorisme et d’autres questions connexes. Si les atteintes aux libertés civiles vous préoccupent, vous avez intérêt à demander à recevoir cette documentation hebdomadaire. Lire plus


The Human Cost of Killer Drones

1483227_499626696811262_761027350_n-168x300Muslim Link 08/12/2013 – The Desmarais building at the University of Ottawa was the site for a moving presentation on November 25 about drone aircraft and the frightening toll they are taking on the civilian populations in Yemen, Pakistan, and other nations.  About two hundred people attended the presentation and many more listened in and participated online. Organized by the Canadian Peace Alliance, the Ottawa Peace Assembly, and the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group (ICMLG), the talk took place at the Human Rights Research and Education Centre.

Farea Al-Muslimi, a Yemeni youth activist and writer, was the keynote speaker for the evening.   Al Muslimi is the son of farmers in a rural, mountainous section of Yemen called Wasab, 200 kilometers south of the nation’s capital, Sana’a. Due to his tireless crusade against the use of armed drones, and his recent testimony in Washington where he lobbied against drone use,  Al-Muslimi has come to be known as “the man who made Obama admit the use of drones.” Lire plus


Know your government!

Par Gerry Caplan, rabble.ca 16/09/2013 – I’ve often referred in these columns to some of my reliable authorities — the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, the Rideau Institute, The Daily Show — but let me introduce here three others that I find indispensable. In no particular order: Anyone apprehensive about how our liberties are being eroded before our very eyes — secret surveillance, the punishment of dissent — should not miss the weekly News Digest issued by the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group. Despite its name, the ICLMG is an all-Canadian coalition of 38 national civil society organizations that focuses both on Canada and elsewhere. The digest publishes “news articles, events, calls to action and much more regarding national security, anti-terrorism, civil liberties and other issues related to the mandate and concerns of ICLMG and its member organizations.” The 38 members are a Who’s Who of progressive, activist Canada, and among them they represent just about every decent tendency in the country, including representatives of Muslims, Jews and Christians, trade unions, students, profs, lawyers, NGOs, refugees, environmentalists and any other virtuous groups you can think of. When Harperland compiles its “enemies list,” it surely includes most of the 38 — a badge of honour by any reckoning. Lire plus


Civil liberties, pro-democracy, privacy rights, and open Internet groups call for answers on secret government spying program

195-2rabble.ca 11/06/2013 – A group of organizations focused on civil liberties, pro-democracy, privacy rights, and open access to the Internet have joined to together to demand answers and immediate action from the government after it was revealed that a secretive government agency has been spying on the telephone and Internet activities of individuals, including law-abiding Canadians. The organizations speaking out today include the BC Freedom of Information and Privacy Association (BCFIPA), Council of Canadians, International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group, Leadnow, OpenMedia.ca, Privacy & Access Council of Canada, the Rocky Mountain Civil Liberties Association, and the Samuelson-Glushko Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC). OpenMedia.ca worked with many of these same organizations to host the StopSpying.ca campaign that successfully defeated the government’s online spying bill C-30. Lire plus


CPAC Revue Politique on Bill S-7

195-31CPAC 24/04/2013 – Pierre Donais welcomes MPs from the three main parties in the House of Commons for a discussion on topics highlighted in Parliament today. The International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group has once again asked federal MPs to reject Bill S-7, which deals with the fight against terrorism. Roch Tassé, the national coordinator, explains his organization’s objections to this legislation. Visionnez l’entrevue

Other interviews on Bill S-7:

  • 24 avril 2013 – Entrevue avec CTV News (TV)
  • 24 avril 2013 – Entrevue pour la radio communautaire de Humber College à Toronto (Radio)
  • 30 avril 2013 – Entrevue pour la OPIRG Root Radio show sur CKCU 93.1 FM (Radio)

Critics say biometric borders threaten civil liberties

195-30Capital News Online 01/02/2013 – A new biometric system designed to screen temporary residents entering Canada has come under fire from the NDP and activists who warn that data-sharing with the U.S. threatens civil liberties and signals a dystopic future. “If you’ve never committed a crime, you have the right under the Charter to be anonymous from the state, unless you’re doing an operation that requires a permit, like driving a car,” says Roch Tassé, coordinator of the Ottawa-based International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group, a coalition that includes Amnesty International and other human rights groups. Lire plus


Harkat’s press conference on Parliament Hill

195-29YouTube 10/12/2012 – Today marks the 10th anniversary of Mohamed Harkat’s arrest under a security certificate. Ironically, it is also International Human Rights Day. ICLMG was on Parliament Hill with Mohamed Harkat, his family, Hilary Homes from Amnesty International, Ihsaan Gardee from CAIR-CAN, Randall Garrison, the NDP Public Safety critic and Elizabeth May, leader of the Green Party to denounce the security certificate regime and demand that this human rights violation stops. Visionnez la vidéo


Travellers faced rude officers, incorrect accusations by border employees

195-28The Canadian Press 04/09/2012 – Roch Tasse, the national co-ordinator of ICLMG, said the complaints system should be shifted to an independent agency and more complete descriptions provided to the public. “Surely there’s enough information in the system, or there should be if there’s not, to show you’re not the same person,” he said in an interview. “What are the odds that you have the same birth date, live in the same city … I don’t know why we have those incidents.” Tasse said his group’s reviews of border incidents two years ago showed more serious incidents and he questions if the internal review system is effective. “We’re dealing here with an internal complaints system, not an independent body. So regardless of the content and the outcome, this is an agency investigating itself following complaints,” he said. Lire plus


Notes detail Canada-U.S. plan to track refugees, travellers

195-27The Canadian Press 11/07/2012 – Canada and the U.S. have appreciably different ways of dealing with some kinds of refugees, said Roch Tasse of the Ottawa-based International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group. « This raises flags as to what they will agree on down the road, » Tasse said in an interview. « We know that the Safe Third Country Agreement is already problematic. There are people who would be eligible in Canada that are not eligible in the U.S. But, because they arrived through the U.S., (they) are refused into Canada, and the U.S. deals with them the way they want. » The two countries will also begin automatically sharing information by 2014 about people booted out for criminal behaviour. Lire plus


Activists demand the abolition of security certificates

195-41Prism Magazine 16/02/2012 – Human rights activists, joined by the Green Party Leader Elizabeth May, announce at a press conference that was held on Parliament Hill their opposition to the continued use of security certificate cases in Canada. In attendance were: Matthew Behrens, Human Rights Activist, Alex Neve, Secretary General of Amnesty International Canada, Roch Tasse, ICLMG Coordinator, Nour El-Kadri, VP of the Canadian Arab Federation, and Elizabeth May, Leader of the Green Party. Visionnez la vidéo


Canada : La police pourra épier les internautes sans mandat

195-25Le Devoir 15/02/2012 – Les défenseurs des libertés civiles craignent ce projet de loi. «Ça semble assez inoffensif comme ça, mais ça vient décupler les capacités des instances gouvernementales pour surveiller les individus, résume Roch Tassé, coordonnateur de la Coalition pour la surveillance internationale des libertés civiles. Le niveau de protection de la vie privée est moins élevé dans ce cadre que dans celui qui régit la surveillance des conversations téléphoniques. Cela va permettre à des services de renseignement d’aller à la pêche [à l’information]. On pourrait s’en servir pour espionner des journalistes et leurs sources, pour faire la cartographie des relations d’un individu, et ce, sans supervision judiciaire…» Lire plus


Frontière canado-américaine: inquiétudes pour la protection de la vie privée

195-24La Presse 08/12/2011 – Des groupes de défense des libertés civiles s’inquiètent au plus haut point des implications du plan de périmètre de sécurité présenté hier par les gouvernements canadien et américain. «On n’a jamais vu, dans une seule annonce, une érosion aussi grande et aussi globale des normes historiques et des protections que l’on connaît selon nos normes canadiennes», a dénoncé Roch Tassé, porte-parole de la Coalition pour la surveillance internationale des libertés civiles. Lire plus


La parole à Roch Tassé, coordonnateur de la CSILC

195-23Métro 29/01/2010 – Quelle forme prend la surveillance que vous dénoncez? On laisse des traces quand on fait des opérations bancaires. Si votre cellulaire est muni d’un GPS, on peut savoir où vous êtes. En examinant vos amis sur Facebook, on peut analyser votre réseau. Les entreprises de crédit ont l’historique de vos transactions financières; bref, on peut déterminer votre style de vie. Mais au-delà de tout ça, il existe des banques de données où on vous fiche carrément. Lire plus


Québec : Le permis de conduire à puce fait débat

195-21Codeclic.com 25/03/2009 – Nous vous en parlions avant-hier, le permis de conduire « plus » devrait être disponible dès le 1er Juin dans la province québécoise. Néanmoins, ce permis ne fait pas l’unanimité. En cause ? la puce intégrée à l’intérieur du précieux document. En effet, de nombreuses organisations militant pour la défense des consommateurs et du droit à la vie privée dénoncent les dérives que pourraient entraîner l’utilisation de la puce d’identification. Selon monsieur Roch Tassé (porte-parole de la Coalition pour la surveillance internationale des libertés civiles), « Les permis de conduire Plus ne nous protégeront pas du terrorisme, ils n’accéléreront pas la circulation aux frontières, mais ils soulèveront de graves questions quant à la protection de la vie privée. ». Le débat reste ouvert. Lire plus